A World of Ideas to Keep a Crime Writer Busy

Crime writers will not have to worry about a lack of source material for their story ideas any time soon.

Now that the pandemic and the protests are slipping down in the news headlines, we’re seeing the normal run of everyday crimes getting some media attention again.

Despite the lockdown, we still seem to be murdering each other and stealing other people’s stuff, while our political and corporate leaders continue playing their corrupt power games. 

While most of us have been happily surfing the web to distract ourselves from or to follow the pandemic and protests, several state actors have been actively engaged in cybercrime, espionage, and the dissemination of false information across social media. And, that’s without mentioning the antics of that man in the White House.

There are story ideas everywhere you look. 

Guess I’ll be writing a few more books like the Stella Bruno Investigates story I’m currently working on.

Music for reading or writing

Sheet music

You can hear a lot of things sitting in silence. Continue reading “Music for reading or writing”

10 positive aspects of blogging

  1. It’s fun
  2. Allows you to showcase your writing on a range of topics
  3. It’s inexpensive
  4. Reader comments
  5. Provides worldwide exposure for your books
  6. Requires learning a new skill set
  7. It’s an outlet for your artistic creativity
  8. Enables you to promote the work of others
  9. Vehicle for articulating your perspective on the world
  10. It’s a great way for connecting with other people.

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Journals

There is some writing that is best done with pen and paper. This is where journals come in. A journal is a book you create by writing down your thoughts, and your answers to those questions that bother you, or that you have been putting off looking at for years.

Journals are a pathway to self-discovery or self-recovery.

You can write what you like in a journal. You’re the only person who is likely to ever read it, and you’ll be dead when, and if, anybody else reads it, unless you come from New York, where everybody seems to publish a book about their personal journey.

Journals

Peter Mulraney in Sanity Savers

 

Writing murder

Most of us do not commit murder, except in our fantasies.

It’s okay, you can admit to those murderous thoughts you’ve had about killing your boss, your spouse, that idiot that cut you off in traffic, or the one that got the promotion you know belonged to you. Continue reading “Writing murder”

Writing from the heart

On Saturday, 22 March 2014, I participated in the Writing from the heart workshop offered by Nancy Aronie at the New York Open Center.

This was a writing workshop with a difference. We were asked to write two pieces in response to a prompt. We spent twenty minutes writing the first piece and then shared it with the group. Then we had a break for lunch. After lunch, we spent ten minutes writing the second piece before sharing.

We got to ‘hear the voice’ of each writer in the words chosen and in the way each of us spoke our pieces. Continue reading “Writing from the heart”

The rule of three

The idea for this week’s post comes from Bob Baker, who is the guru of guerrilla marketing for authors and book publishers, so you can probably guess why I know about him.

Bob suggests we limit ourselves to three big goals for the year, instead of overwhelming ourselves with a long list of resolutions as we embark on the new year.

He suggests that once we have our three goals, we can draw up a plan of action, using the rule of three, to break down what needs to be done to achieve those goals into manageable steps. What the project management people call ‘chunking’. Yes, I do project management in other parts of my life – and it comes in handy when you’re writing and publishing your own books. Continue reading “The rule of three”