Reading Twisted Justice

There are times when it feels like taking the law into your own hands is the only option you have for obtaining justice. Fortunately, most of us resist the temptation to act on that impulse and put our trust in the justice system. Sometimes, though, people take the other option.

The opening story in Twisted Justice explores what happens when Trent Mitchell takes that option and administers the justice the system refused to give him. 

I’m sure very few people take that option lightly, and Trent is no different. He’s agonised over his decision for years but there are only so many sleepless nights and tormented dreams a man can endure.

If you keep going over the same story in your head, it’s like reliving the story every time you tell it. If you blame someone else for what happened, you can come to believe you must take action so they pay for your loss. This is where Trent Mitchell is when we meet him. He’s planning his first execution.

If you’ve read the earlier books in this series, you’ll know there will be more than one crime story and the stories will somehow be connected. The second story involves car thief, Ian Holden. I think you’ll like the way I introduce him into the story.

Ian’s a man with a different problem. He’s part of a car-stealing gang and he’s just been caught with the goods. There may be honour among thieves but that doesn’t always translate into trust, and this is where Ian Holden’s real problem lies.

When Twisted Justice opens, DI West’s team is investigating a car-stealing racket that seems to be doing the impossible. Then, Trent Mitchell strikes, and Carl has to divide his attention and resources to solve both cases.

This is a bit of a different read, where you know who the killer is right at the start and get to ride along with the team as it works out who he is.

You also get a look into how the team uses incremental steps to build the case against the mastermind of the car-stealing gang. Wayne seems a little obsessed with this one.

And, of course, there are a few twists and turns. Let’s face it, logical people often make irrational decisions – and that’s what makes crime so interesting.

Twisted Justice is available from a range of online retailers.

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Reading Whistleblower

Whistleblower: someone who informs on a person or organisation engaging in unlawful or immoral acts. 

We hear about the more sensational whistleblowers, like Edward Snowden, who take their stories to the media. Most public service whistleblowing is nothing like that. It’s routine and done behind closed doors far away from the media spotlight.

Whistleblower starts with the routine reporting of a suspicion that something is not quite right in the Office of State Supply. However, the whistleblower makes a mistake that alerts those involved and puts him in harm’s way.

The story explores a simple premise: the whistleblower has his own secret that leads to his death after he lifts the lid on the secret dealings of the Office of State Supply.

But, as anyone who’s read the other books in this series will know, it won’t be that simple. You will find several stories wrapped together in this tale of murder and intrigue. Continue reading “Reading Whistleblower”

Reading Holy Death

The initial thought behind the writing of Holy Death was imagining a victim of child sex abuse taking the law into his own hands and dealing out retribution, and wondering what would happen after that.

One complicating factor I decided to include was having two victims of the same perpetrator take action independently on the same night, using very different methodologies.

One takes direct action and murders the abuser priest. The other takes a more indirect approach and kills the abuser’s closest friend, another priest, hoping to inflict a sense of the loss he has suffered. Continue reading “Reading Holy Death”

Reading The Holiday

The Holiday came from me wondering what would happen if an old man and a young boy took off for the weekend without telling anyone, in the hope that their action would bring the boy’s parents back together, and then everything goes wrong.

To help things go wrong, I gave the old man, Kieran Moore, a dark history that puts his great-grandson, Toby, in danger through being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Kieran gets killed. Toby gets kidnapped because he’s a kid and Kieran’s killers can’t bring themselves to kill a ten-year-old boy. This storyline ultimately leads to Clare’s story, which we will come back to in a minute.

Continue reading “Reading The Holiday”

Scared to Death

Scared to Death by Rachel Amphlett

 A serial killer murdering for kicks.  A detective seeking revenge.

When the body of a snatched schoolgirl is found in an abandoned biosciences building, the case is first treated as a kidnapping gone wrong.

But Detective Kay Hunter isn’t convinced, especially when a man is found dead with the ransom money still in his possession.

When a second schoolgirl is taken, Kay’s worst fears are realised.

With her career in jeopardy and desperate to conceal a disturbing secret, Kay’s hunt for the killer becomes a race against time before he claims another life.

For the killer, the game has only just begun…


I enjoyed reading this one, which I picked up from Kobo when I renewed my VIP membership. It’s the first book in the Kay Hunter series. It’s one of those books you want to read right through in one sitting to find out what happens at the end.

You can find out more about Rachel’s other books at Rachel Amphlett.

Sam Dyke Investigations

Over the last week, I’ve enjoyed reading Altered Life and The Private Lie, the first two books in the Sam Dyke Investigations series by Keith Dixon.

Sam’s a bit headstrong but he’s not one of those superhuman investigators you often encounter in thrillers. He’s got his human foibles. I like him as a character. I’m no so sure I’d like him as a partner.

Both books have intriguing plots, and the stories explore different aspects of relationships between people and between private detectives and the police.

The writing style is clear and easy to read. You also get a good sense of the place in which the stories are set.

I enjoyed both books.

You can find them at keithdixonnovels

 

 

 

Keith Dixon

This week I’m reading Altered Life, the first book in the Sam Dyke Investigations series by Keith Dixon.

Keith describes his Sam Dyke Investigations series as the story of one man’s quest to stop screwing up his life while finding and catching bad guys.

Although the series in set in the north of England, Keith admits to being influenced by American crime writers.

Check out the details at keithdixonnovels  – where you can download the first two books in the series for free to see if you like his style. I do.

Melissa Lane Girl Detective

Here’s something a little different.

One of my friends from Crime Writers SA, Reece Pocock, has written a detective story for 7 to 11 year olds: Melissa Lane Girl Detective: In the case of the stolen lunch money.

Something to consider if you have some young readers at your place looking for something to read on their Kindle or iPad. Be interested to know what they think of it – I’m sure Reece would.

There’s more

If you enjoyed Deadly Sands, there’s more to the Inspector West story.

If you’d prefer to read Deadly Sands on your e-reader, tablet of smartphone, join my Crime Readers Group and you can download a free copy.

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