A view from Australia

Leaves on pathAustralia is having an unusual double dissolution election, where every member of both houses of the Federal Parliament is up for re-election. Usually, only half the Senate is contested at a federal election. So, this one could be interesting.

The first thing I noticed when I arrived back in Australia from the USA on Monday, and watched the TV coverage in the lounge at Melbourne airport while waiting for my connection, was the difference in the tone of the campaign being waged here. Continue reading “A view from Australia”

Fire trucks in New York.

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Image by Anthony Delanoix | Unsplash.com

The fire trucks go a lot slower in New York than they do in Adelaide.

For someone used to seeing fire trucks moving along city streets at speed, watching them thread their way through traffic on Eighth Avenue, with sirens wailing and horns blaring, is disconcerting – and hard on the ears. Maybe things burn a lot slower here than they do in Australia. Who knows? Continue reading “Fire trucks in New York.”

Meaningful work and wage justice

Most of us spend a lot of time working. Some of us are lucky enough to spend that time doing things we love.

A lot of us are looking for meaning through our work or are on a quest for meaningful work.

Is this quest a dream? Perhaps. Continue reading “Meaningful work and wage justice”

A short history of walls

Walls are not new to Americans. There used to be one on Wall Street.

opejnart.org

Some Ancient History

The Chinese built a wall. We know it as the Great Wall of China. They’ve had their wall for more than a thousand years. It didn’t keep out the Manchurians – they came in through a gate, and it didn’t keep out the Europeans – they came by boat. It’s probably been more successful as a tourist attraction than as a defensive barrier. In fact, they’re restoring parts of it so that we can marvel at the engineering feat that created it. Continue reading “A short history of walls”

4 drivers of crime

Crime fiction explores personal motives, like revenge or jealousy, to explain why people commit crime. But what’s driving real crime?

Four drivers to consider:

  • Poverty
  • Lack of respect
  • Greed
  • Lack of political courage

Continue reading “4 drivers of crime”

Forest Kindergartens

I watched a TV program on forest kindergartens in Denmark.

The kids seemed to be enjoying themselves splashing through puddles, climbing trees and exploring their surroundings.

ForestWhy wouldn’t they? The whole learning program is based on things kids can do outdoors in any kind of weather.

The only thing their parents have to worry about is appropriate clothing. Continue reading “Forest Kindergartens”

Transition

BridgeI’ve just started reading Transitions: Making Sense of Life’s Changes by William Bridges.

He tells us life is full of change. No surprises there.

I learnt early in life that you can’t stop things changing, no matter how hard you try. Sometimes it really is outside your control. Continue reading “Transition”

Confirmation

An anti-Islamic political party was launched in a secret location in Australia last night.

I heard one of their spokesmen being interviewed on Radio National this morning.

His answers to the questions posed by the journalist, while highly entertaining, simply confirmed the suspicions I expressed in my previous post: IQ.

BTW: The secret location was not prompted by fears of being attacked by Islamic terrorists but rather fears of being laughed out of town by the wider Australian community.

These words are already in the language

Social Integration

A process allowing members of a society to achieve and maintain peaceful social relations through dialogue. Social Integration is focused on the need to move toward a safe, stable and just society by forming and mending conditions of social disintegration – social fragmentation, exclusion and polarization; and by expanding and strengthening conditions of social integration – towards peaceful social relations of coexistence, collaboration and cohesion. Continue reading “These words are already in the language”

IQ

 

I thought IQ stood for Intelligence Quotient.

I’m starting to wonder whether it actually stands for Idiocy Quotient.

I could be mistaken but, with the level of political dialogue on display around the world in recent times, I have my doubts.

Thanks for dropping by, Peter.