Liminal Thinking

‘Liminal thinking is the art of creating change by understanding, shaping, and reframing beliefs.’

Ever wondered how you ended up with the belief set that’s controlling your view of the world?  I have and, fortunately, so has Dave Gray.

liminal-thinking

 

Dave’s written a book about it: Liminal Thinking.

He uses six principles to explain how beliefs shape everything, and gives us nine practices we can use to do something about it.

The book is easy to read and understand. I love his illustrations – they might inspire me to try a few myself.

If you want to create some change in your life, do yourself a favour and get a copy of Dave’s book.

You can get an overview of its content and Dave’s philosophy of liminal thinking at liminalthinking.com.


Peter Mulraney is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic, The New Girlfriendand Everyday Project Management

The One Who Got Away

The+One+Who+Got+Away

The One Who Got Away is the latest offering by Caroline Overington.

It popped up in a recommendations email from Kobo the week I was planning to fly across the Pacific.

I haven’t read any of her other books but I had seen her name in an article discussing women crime writers. Apparently, they’re doing things differently, like not having an investigator as the protagonist, so I bought the book. Had every intention of reading it on the plane. Finally got around to reading it – in one sitting – last weekend.

Intriguing story and, yes, it’s not driven by a police investigator, but what I like about the book is the way in which the story is told. It has four narrators, so you get four perspectives – five actually, when you consider that one of the narrators interviews one of the other main characters in the story who doesn’t otherwise get a say. And, I wasn’t expecting the ending.

Here’s a link to the book’s page on Kobo but you might not be able to buy yourself a copy if you are in the US – an example of the games played by publishers.

Here’s a link to Caroline Overington’s profile on Kobo so you can see what else she’s written.


 

Peter Mulraney is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic, The New Girlfriendand Everyday Project Management.

The Obstacle is the Way

Every now and then you come across a book that summarises the learnings of your lifetime, and you realise you are not walking the path alone.

The Obstacle is the Way by Ryan Holiday is one of those books for me.

Steven Pressfield, author of the War of Art, describes it as a pocket handbook for Jedi knights.

I think we can all use one of those – even if we’re still afraid of admitting to our knighthood.

Yoda

The force be with you.

Flow

Sometimes you get a surprise when you read management training material.

Some people have names you cannot pronounce, like Csikzentmihalyi.

Today, I noticed an advert for a book called Flow: the psychology of optimal experience by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, at the end of a module on performance management. (I was at work.)

I Googled it and found this review, which gives a comprehensive summary of the book, on www.meaningfulhq.com

Thanks for dropping by, Peter.

The Pause Principle

“The Pause Principle is the conscious, intentional process of stepping back, within ourselves and outside of ourselves, to lead forward with greater authenticity, purpose and contribution. This value-creating methodology allows more examination, higher-order logic, rational analysis, more profound questioning, deeper listening, higher-quality presence, broader perspective, greater openness to diverse thinking and input, and ultimately more impactful, influential, and innovative action.”

The Pause Principle: Step back to Lead Forward by Kevin Cashman Continue reading “The Pause Principle”

Creative journal writing

 Journal with pen

‘Creative journal writing goes way beyond just recording events on paper. Without needing any rigid formula to gain success, it is the companion that supports but does not judge. It can be a place of unparalleled discovery and a creative playground where the everyday rules no longer count. Proven benefits of journal writing include reduced stress and anxiety, increased self-awareness, sharpened mental skills, genuine psychological insight, creative inspiration and motivation, strengthened ability to cope during difficult times, and overall physical and emotional well-being.’  

From the back cover of Creative Journal Writing by Stephanie Dowrick. If you’re thinking about starting a journal, you might find this book of value.

Thanks for dropping by, Peter.

Books on the shelf

Cup and notebook on table

Sometimes you go to the bookshelf and pull out a book you’ve forgotten or perhaps never knew about – because someone else in your household bought it and put it on the shelf.

Today, I pulled down It’s Never Too Late….174 simple acts to change your life by Patrick Lindsay for a quiet read. Continue reading “Books on the shelf”

Listening to your life

I’ve started reading The Art of Work: A proven path to discovering what you were meant to do, by Jeff Goin – after hearing Jeff being interviewed by Jonathan Fields on the Goodlife Project. Continue reading “Listening to your life”

Conscious capitalism

coinsCapitalism gets a bad wrap in some sections of the media.

To be honest, the behaviour of some corporations and individuals in the business world leaves a lot to be desired. It doesn’t take much research to uncover examples of exploitative or unethical practices.

Most of us have probably heard or read stories of investor fraud and falsified accounting. If you need a reminder do a Google search on Enron. Continue reading “Conscious capitalism”