Phoenix

Phoenix by Mark Dawson

Mark Dawson is the author of the John Milton and Beatrix Rose thriller series.

In Phoenix, written to help fund a friend’s medical expenses, Mark brings his two two heroes together for a plausible but highly improbable mission – the usual stuff of thrillers. It’s even got a touch of a POTUS 45 tweet about it, with the Brits doing the dirty work for the CIA.

It’s a quick and enjoyable read.

You can find Phoenix on Amazon and read about Mark on Mark Dawson.

Crime fiction set in Australia

The Stella Bruno Investigates series is set in and around Adelaide, South Australia.

A few things to bear in mind when reading The Identity Thief.

Australia went metric in 1975. The units of measurements are the same ones you encounter in Europe.

Distance is expressed in kilometres (and we spell it that way too), temperature in degrees Celsius, weight in kilograms, and height in metres or centimetres.

Continue reading “Crime fiction set in Australia”

Fredrik Backman

Every now and then you come across a book you really enjoy. A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman is one of those books for me.

On the surface, it’s a grumpy old man story. Maybe that’s why my wife suggested I read it. But, underneath the surface story, it’s a story of love and redemption.

If you’re ever feeling down, like Ove is at the start of the story, reading this book will remind you that the secret is to get outside of yourself. Think of other people. Do things for them. Be with them.

A Man Called Ove is a wonderful story of how Life intervenes to get Ove’s attention and reopen his heart. Some of it is sad, some of it is touching, and some of it is really funny. I enjoyed it.

You can find out more about Fredrik Backman and his books at:

Publisher’s page

Blog – in Swedish

Amazon page

From the Hay House World Summit 2017

Over the last few days, I’ve been listening in to the free Hay House World Summit 2107.  A really smart way of showcasing the work of one hundred of their authors.

You can still register to listen in to the last week of so of the summit.

If you enjoyed My Life is My Responsibility: Insights for Conscious Living you might appreciate the three books I’m currently reading as a result of what was available for the first session of the summit.

A Course In Miracles Made Easy by Alan Cohen.

The overview you always wanted if you thought A Course In Miracles was beyond you.

The Abundance Code by Julie Ann Cairns

An introduction to a different way of thinking about abundance.

Be Your Potential by Joseph Clough

If you’re interested in what’s going on in your subconscious mind and wondering what you can do about it.

Patricia Loofbourrow

NY Times and USA Today best-selling science fiction author, Patricia Loofbourrow, is creating a transmedia project surrounding the far future domed neo-Victorian city of Bridges, which is now split between four crime families.

The centre of this project is a 13 part steampunk neo-noir novel called the Red Dog Conspiracy, which follows the story of a female private eye named Jacqueline Spadros.

You’re invited to take a look and join the experiment at  Red Dog Conspiracy 

Computers making a difference

We take computers for granted but it wasn’t that long ago we were doing a lot of things we now do with computers by hand.

I suspect the world’s become a different place since the arrival of computers.

Let’s consider a few places computers are making a difference.

Banking

I remember the days when a bank teller wrote entries by hand in your passbook every time you deposited or withdrew money, and the long queues at the bank. When I started working in a bank, they were still using passbooks but a computer did the writing, and then passbooks became plastic cards and the computer sent you a monthly statement.

Then banks replaced tellers with safes attached to a computer (automated teller machines) which identified your account from that plastic card and dispensed cash into your hand.

Hardly anybody uses cash these days. We get paid electronically, we pay our bills online and use those plastic cards to make our purchases. There’s even talk of us becoming a cashless society, thanks to computers.

Communications

Where would we be without our smartphones? How often do we stop and consider that we’re walking around with a computer in our hand or in our handbag? And, isn’t it so easy to stay in touch?

It’s not just personal communications. Computers are all through the telephone system. We might not like speaking to a computer, choosing which button to press, or keying in our customer number when we call customer support but those things allow the computer to route our call to the appropriate person and display our information on that person’s screen when we reach the top of the queue.

Health Services

It used to be accepted that nobody but a pharmacist could read a doctor’s handwriting. These days when you visit, the doctor spends most of the time typing and the script is printed by a computer. Not only does that make it easier for the pharmacist, it also creates a legible record that the next doctor can read.

But that’s not all computers are doing in health services, as you can read in 8 Ways Technology Is Improving Your Health by Karen Reed.

Policing

Modern policing involves extensive use of computers. Take a look inside a patrol car the next time you see one parked in the street and think about the use police make of databases. It might not be like what you see on CSI just yet, but computers have given police an edge many of us (except crime writers like me) don’t think about.

For example, in response to a growing heroin problem in New York City, the NYPD recently announced it is using data collected by its officers on the street to predict where heroin will show up next in the city. Apparently, the NYPD has been using data collected by its officers to manage crime in the city for several years. Can you imagine them doing that without computers to collect, collate and analyze their data?

In the UK, police use a database called HOLMES 2 to analyze the massive amounts of data collected during investigations. That type of database makes information visible, instead of leaving it in one officer’s head or notebook, and allows more officers to join the dots.

I think it’s got to point where we’ve become dependent on computers, so we’d better make sure there’s an ongoing supply of renewable electricity, as I can’t see us going back to a pre-computer world. What do you think?


Peter Mulraney is the author of the Inspector West crime series, the Living Alone series of self-help books for men, Sharing the Journey: Reflections of a Reluctant Mystic, The New Girlfriendand Everyday Business  Skills series.

Publishing update

Recently published

Everyday Money Management (Everyday Business Skills book 3)

If you never seem to have enough money or you’re thinking about starting a small business – this is a book for you.

The problem with money is never the money.

Money is simply a tool. The problem with money management always comes down to one thing: the money manager. In your case, if you’re having money problems, that’s you.

Money management is a simple task that is easy to understand but it requires a plan and self-discipline.

In Everyday Money Management, retired banker and auditor, Peter Mulraney, gives you the money management education you missed.

Study the four basic principles, follow the money management strategy, and take charge of your money.

BUY from:  Amazon | CreateSpace Kobo | Smashwords

 In the publishing pipeline

The mystic returns with a new book of insights.

My Life is My Responsibility: Insights for Conscious Living

Conscious living involves being aware of what’s going on in your life and, more importantly, what’s going on in your mind.

How you experience life depends on what you choose to believe.

If you never take the time to examine your beliefs, or to question your assumptions, you end up living unconsciously. When you live unconsciously, you live your life according to somebody else’s beliefs. You end up trying to meet somebody else’s expectations and not your own.

The insights in this book flow from a sense of being aware that you can change the world, but not in the way most of us think about doing that.

Real change happens when you accept that there is only one thing that can be changed: how you choose to see things.

Maryann Miller

Maryann Miller is the creator of the Seasons Mystery Series, set in Dallas, Texas, featuring homicide detectives, Sarah Kingsly and Angel Johnson, who don’t particularly like each other.

 

 

In Open Season,  the unlikely pair investigates a series of murders, dubbed the Mall Murders, amid racial tensions and a deadly controversy involving the police.

 

 

 

In  Stalking Season, Sarah and Angel find themselves inside an exclusive gentleman’s club and a prestigious private school, as they investigate the murder of a young girl in a cheap motel.

 

If you’re looking for some crime fiction with female lead investigators for a change, you can check these and Maryann’s other books out at:  maryannwrites.